Ph: 401.466.2974 | Fax: 401-466-5476 | DIAL 911 IN AN EMERGENCY

How Well Masks Protect

 

A detailed study shows the maximum risks of being infected by the coronavirus for different scenarios with and without masks

Prof. Dr. Eberhard Bodenschatz

Dr. Manuel Maidorn

Original publication

Gholamhossein Bagheri, Birte Thiede, Bardia Hejazi, Oliver Schlenczek und Eberhard Bodenschatz

An upper bound on one-to-one exposure to infectious human respiratory particles
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, December 7, 2021

 

For Full Article Click Here

 

Three metres are not enough to ensure protection. Even at that distance, it takes less than five minutes for an unvaccinated person standing in the breath of a person with Covid-19 to become infected with almost 100 percent certainty. That’s the bad news. The good news is that if both are wearing well-fitting medical or, even better, FFP2 masks, the risk drops dramatically. In a comprehensive study, a team from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organisation in Göttingen has investigated to what extent masks protect under which wearing conditions. In the process, the researchers determined the maximum risk of infection for numerous situations and considered several factors that have not been included in similar studies to date.

 

Moving safely: tight-fitting FFP2 and KN95 masks drastically reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection, even during prolonged encounters at close range, as is inevitable on public transport. They protect particularly well when both the infected and non-infected person wear their masks properly.

 

The Göttingen team was surprised at how great the risk of infection with the coronavirus is. “We would not have thought that at a distance of several metres it would take so little time for the infectious dose to be absorbed from the breath of a virus carrier,” says Eberhard Bodenschatz, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organisation. At this distance, the breathing air has already spread in a cone shape in the air; the infectious particles are correspondingly diluted. In addition, the particularly large and thus virus-rich particles fall to the ground after only a short distance through the air. “In our study we found that the risk of infection without wearing masks is enormously high after only a few minutes, even at a distance of three metres, if the infected persons have the high viral load of the delta variant of the Sars-CoV-2 virus,” says Eberhard Bodenschatz. And such encounters are unavoidable in schools, restaurants, clubs or even outdoors.

 

Well-fitting FFP2 masks reduce the risk at least into the per thousand range.

 

 

As high as the risk of infection is without mouth-nose protection, medical or FFP2 masks protect effectively. The Göttingen study confirms that FFP2 or KN95 masks are particularly effective in filtering infectious particles from the air breathed – especially if they are as tightly sealed as possible at the face. If both the infected and the non-infected person wear well-fitting FFP2 masks, the maximum risk of infection after 20 minutes is hardly more than one per thousand, even at the shortest distance. If their masks fit poorly, the probability of infection increases to about four percent. If both wear well-fitting medical masks, the virus is likely to be transmitted within 20 minutes with a maximum probability of ten percent. The study also confirms the intuitive assumption that for effective protection against infection, in particular the infected person should wear a mask that filters as well as possible and fits tightly to the face.

 

The infection probabilities determined by the Max Planck team indicate the upper limit of the risk in each case. “In daily life, the actual probability of infection is certainly 10 to 100 times smaller,” says Eberhard Bodenschatz. This is because the air that flows out of the mask at the edges is diluted, so you don’t get all the unfiltered breathing air. But we assumed this because we can’t measure for all situations how much breathing air from one mask wearer reaches another person, and because we wanted to calculate the risk as conservatively as possible,” Bodenschatz explains. “Under these conditions, if even the largest theoretical risk is small, then you’re on the very safe side under real conditions.” For the comparative value without the protection of a mask, however, the safety buffer turns out to be much smaller. “For such a situation, we can determine the viral dose inhaled by an unprotected person with fewer assumptions,” says Gholamhossein Bagheri, who as a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization who is the lead author of the current study.

 

“Masks in schools are a very good idea”

 

In their calculations of the risk of infection, the Göttingen team considered a number of factors that had not previously been included in comparable studies. For example, the researchers investigated how a poor fit of the mask weakens the protection and how this can be prevented. “The materials of FFP2 or KN95 masks, but also of some medical masks, filter extremely effectively,” says Gholamhossein Bagheri. “The risk of infection is then dominated by the air coming out and going in at the edges of the mask.” This happens when the edge of the mask is not close to the face. In elaborate experiments, Bagheri, Bodenschatz and their team measured the size and amount of respiratory particles that flow past the edges of masks that fit differently. “A mask can be excellently adapted to the shape of the face if you bend its metal strap into a rounded W before putting it on,” says Eberhard Bodenschatz. “Then the infectious aerosol particles no longer get past the mask, and glasses no longer fog up either.”

 

 

41 second video on the effectiveness of masks

 

How masks protect against Covid-19

 

Using a manikin, a team from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organisation demonstrates how the respiratory cloud, and possibly coronaviruses with it, spread in different scenarios. Without a mask, many potentially infectious particles disperse in the room. Surgical masks already reduce the amount significantly, even if they fit poorly. Tight-fitting FFP2 or KN95 masks protect particularly well.

 

The team also considered that droplets that people spread when they breathe or speak dry while in the air and become lighter. This means that they remain in the air longer but also have an increased virus concentration as equal size droplets directly after release. When inhaled, the opposite happens: the particles take up water again, grow like a drop in the cloud and therefore deposit more easily in the respiratory tract.

 

Although the detailed analysis by the Max Planck researchers in Göttingen shows that tight-fitting FFP2 masks provide 75 times better protection compared to well-fitting surgical masks and that the way a mask is worn makes a huge difference;  even medical masks significantly reduce the risk of infection compared to a situation without any mouth-nose protection at all. “That’s why it’s so important for people to wear a mask during the pandemic,” says Gholamhossein Bagheri. And Eberhard Bodenschatz adds, “Our results show once again that mask-wearing in schools and also in general is a very good idea.”

Qué tan bien protegen las máscaras

Un estudio detallado muestra los riesgos máximos de infectarse por el coronavirus para diferentes escenarios con y sin máscaras

Prof. Dr. Eberhard Bodenschatz

Dr. Manuel Maidorn

Publicación original

Gholamhossein Bagheri, Birte Thiede, Bardia Hejazi, Oliver Schlenczek y Eberhard Bodenschatz

Un límite superior en la exposición uno a uno a partículas respiratorias humanas infecciosas
Actas de la Academia Nacional de Ciencias, 7 de diciembre de 2021

 Para leer el artículo completo, haga clic aquí

Tres metros no son suficientes para garantizar la protección. Incluso a esa distancia, se necesitan menos de cinco minutos para que una persona no vacunada de pie en el aliento de una persona con Covid-19 se infecte con casi un 100 por ciento de certeza. Ésa es la mala noticia. La buena noticia es que si ambos usan máscaras médicas que les queden bien o, mejor aún, máscaras FFP2, el riesgo disminuye drásticamente. En un estudio exhaustivo, un equipo del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización en Gotinga ha investigado hasta qué punto protegen las máscaras y bajo qué condiciones de uso. En el proceso, los investigadores determinaron el riesgo máximo de infección para numerosas situaciones y consideraron varios factores que no se han incluido en estudios similares hasta la fecha.

Moverse con seguridad: las máscaras ajustadas FFP2 y KN95 reducen drásticamente el riesgo de infección por COVID-19, incluso durante encuentros prolongados a corta distancia, como es inevitable en el transporte público. Protegen particularmente bien cuando tanto la persona infectada como la no infectada usan sus máscaras correctamente.

El equipo de Göttingen se sorprendió de lo grande que es el riesgo de infección por el coronavirus. “No hubiéramos pensado que a una distancia de varios metros se necesitaría tan poco tiempo para que la dosis infecciosa se absorbiera del aliento de un portador de virus”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz, director del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autodestrucción. Organización. A esta distancia, el aire respirable ya se ha esparcido en forma de cono en el aire; las partículas infecciosas se diluyen correspondientemente. Además, las partículas particularmente grandes y, por lo tanto, ricas en virus caen al suelo después de una corta distancia a través del aire. “En nuestro estudio encontramos que el riesgo de contagio sin usar mascarillas es enormemente alto después de solo unos minutos, incluso a una distancia de tres metros, si las personas infectadas tienen la carga viral alta de la variante delta del Sars-CoV- 2 “, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. Y esos encuentros son inevitables en escuelas, restaurantes, clubes o incluso al aire libre.

Las máscaras FFP2 bien ajustadas reducen el riesgo al menos en el rango por mil.

Tan alto como el riesgo de infección es sin protección boca-nariz, las máscaras médicas o FFP2 protegen de manera efectiva. El estudio de Göttingen confirma que las máscaras FFP2 o KN95 son particularmente efectivas para filtrar partículas infecciosas del aire respirado, especialmente si están lo más herméticamente selladas posible en la cara. Si tanto la persona infectada como la no infectada usan máscaras FFP2 bien ajustadas, el riesgo máximo de infección después de 20 minutos es apenas superior al uno por mil, incluso a la distancia más corta. Si sus máscaras no le quedan bien, la probabilidad de infección aumenta a alrededor del cuatro por ciento. Si ambos usan máscaras médicas que les queden bien, es probable que el virus se transmita en 20 minutos con una probabilidad máxima del diez por ciento. El estudio también confirma la suposición intuitiva de que para una protección eficaz contra la infección, en particular, la persona infectada debe usar una máscara que filtre lo mejor posible y se ajuste bien a la cara.

Las probabilidades de infección determinadas por el equipo de Max Planck indican el límite superior del riesgo en cada caso. “En la vida diaria, la probabilidad real de infección es sin duda de 10 a 100 veces menor”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. Esto se debe a que el aire que sale de la máscara por los bordes se diluye, por lo que no se obtiene todo el aire respirable sin filtrar. Pero asumimos esto porque no podemos medir en todas las situaciones cuánto aire respirable de un usuario de máscara llega a otra persona, y porque queríamos calcular el riesgo de la manera más conservadora posible “, explica Bodenschatz.” En estas condiciones, incluso el el riesgo teórico más grande es pequeño, entonces estás en el lado muy seguro en condiciones reales “. Sin embargo, para el valor comparativo sin la protección de una máscara, el búfer de seguridad resulta ser mucho más pequeño”. Para tal situación, puede determinar la dosis viral inhalada por una persona desprotegida con menos suposiciones “, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri, quien como líder del grupo de investigación en el Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización y autor principal del estudio actual.

 

“Las máscaras en las escuelas son una muy buena idea”

 

En sus cálculos del riesgo de infección, el equipo de Göttingen consideró una serie de factores que no se habían incluido previamente en estudios comparables. Por ejemplo, los investigadores investigaron cómo un mal ajuste de la máscara debilita la protección y cómo se puede prevenir. “Los materiales de las máscaras FFP2 o KN95, pero también de algunas máscaras médicas, filtran de manera extremadamente eficaz”, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri. “El riesgo de infección está entonces dominado por el aire que sale y entra por los bordes de la máscara”. Esto sucede cuando el borde de la máscara no está cerca del rostro. En experimentos elaborados, Bagheri, Bodenschatz y su equipo midieron el tamaño y la cantidad de partículas respiratorias que fluyen más allá de los bordes de las máscaras que se ajustan de manera diferente. “Una máscara se puede adaptar de manera excelente a la forma de la cara si dobla su correa de metal en una W redondeada antes de ponérsela”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. “Entonces, las partículas de aerosol infecciosas ya no pasan por la máscara y los vasos tampoco se empañan”.

Video de 41 segundos sobre la efectividad de las máscaras

Cómo protegen las máscaras contra Covid-19

Utilizando un maniquí, un equipo del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización demuestra cómo la nube respiratoria, y posiblemente los coronavirus con ella, se propagan en diferentes escenarios. Sin una máscara, muchas partículas potencialmente infecciosas se dispersan en la habitación. Las mascarillas quirúrgicas ya reducen significativamente la cantidad, incluso si se ajustan mal. Las máscaras ajustadas FFP2 o KN95 protegen particularmente bien.

El equipo también consideró que las gotas que las personas esparcen cuando respiran o hablan se secan mientras están en el aire y se vuelven más ligeras. Esto significa que permanecen en el aire por más tiempo, pero también tienen una mayor concentración de virus como gotas del mismo tamaño directamente después de su liberación. Cuando se inhala ocurre lo contrario: las partículas retoman agua, crecen como una gota en la nube y por tanto se depositan más fácilmente en el tracto respiratorio.

Aunque el análisis detallado de los investigadores de Max Planck en Gotinga muestra que las máscaras FFP2 ajustadas brindan una protección 75 veces mejor en comparación con las máscaras quirúrgicas bien ajustadas y que la forma en que se usa una máscara hace una gran diferencia; Incluso las mascarillas médicas reducen significativamente el riesgo de infección en comparación con una situación sin ningún tipo de protección bucal-nasal. “Por eso es tan importante que las personas usen una máscara durante la pandemia”, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri. Y Eberhard Bodenschatz agrega: “Nuestros resultados muestran una vez más que el uso de máscaras en las escuelas y también en general es una muy buena idea”.

Qué tan bien protegen las máscaras

Un estudio detallado muestra los riesgos máximos de infectarse por el coronavirus para diferentes escenarios con y sin máscaras

Prof. Dr. Eberhard Bodenschatz

Dr. Manuel Maidorn

Publicación original

Gholamhossein Bagheri, Birte Thiede, Bardia Hejazi, Oliver Schlenczek y Eberhard Bodenschatz

Un límite superior en la exposición uno a uno a partículas respiratorias humanas infecciosas
Actas de la Academia Nacional de Ciencias, 7 de diciembre de 2021

 

Para leer el artículo completo, haga clic aquí

Tres metros no son suficientes para garantizar la protección. Incluso a esa distancia, se necesitan menos de cinco minutos para que una persona no vacunada de pie en el aliento de una persona con Covid-19 se infecte con casi un 100 por ciento de certeza. Ésa es la mala noticia. La buena noticia es que si ambos usan máscaras médicas que les queden bien o, mejor aún, máscaras FFP2, el riesgo disminuye drásticamente. En un estudio exhaustivo, un equipo del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización en Gotinga ha investigado hasta qué punto protegen las máscaras y bajo qué condiciones de uso. En el proceso, los investigadores determinaron el riesgo máximo de infección para numerosas situaciones y consideraron varios factores que no se han incluido en estudios similares hasta la fecha.

Moverse con seguridad: las máscaras ajustadas FFP2 y KN95 reducen drásticamente el riesgo de infección por COVID-19, incluso durante encuentros prolongados a corta distancia, como es inevitable en el transporte público. Protegen particularmente bien cuando tanto la persona infectada como la no infectada usan sus máscaras correctamente.

El equipo de Göttingen se sorprendió de lo grande que es el riesgo de infección por el coronavirus. “No hubiéramos pensado que a una distancia de varios metros se necesitaría tan poco tiempo para que la dosis infecciosa se absorbiera del aliento de un portador de virus”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz, director del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autodestrucción. Organización. A esta distancia, el aire respirable ya se ha esparcido en forma de cono en el aire; las partículas infecciosas se diluyen correspondientemente. Además, las partículas particularmente grandes y, por lo tanto, ricas en virus caen al suelo después de una corta distancia a través del aire. “En nuestro estudio encontramos que el riesgo de contagio sin usar mascarillas es enormemente alto después de solo unos minutos, incluso a una distancia de tres metros, si las personas infectadas tienen la carga viral alta de la variante delta del Sars-CoV- 2 “, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. Y esos encuentros son inevitables en escuelas, restaurantes, clubes o incluso al aire libre.

Las máscaras FFP2 bien ajustadas reducen el riesgo al menos en el rango por mil.

Tan alto como el riesgo de infección es sin protección boca-nariz, las máscaras médicas o FFP2 protegen de manera efectiva. El estudio de Göttingen confirma que las máscaras FFP2 o KN95 son particularmente efectivas para filtrar partículas infecciosas del aire respirado, especialmente si están lo más herméticamente selladas posible en la cara. Si tanto la persona infectada como la no infectada usan máscaras FFP2 bien ajustadas, el riesgo máximo de infección después de 20 minutos es apenas superior al uno por mil, incluso a la distancia más corta. Si sus máscaras no le quedan bien, la probabilidad de infección aumenta a alrededor del cuatro por ciento. Si ambos usan máscaras médicas que les queden bien, es probable que el virus se transmita en 20 minutos con una probabilidad máxima del diez por ciento. El estudio también confirma la suposición intuitiva de que para una protección eficaz contra la infección, en particular, la persona infectada debe usar una máscara que filtre lo mejor posible y se ajuste bien a la cara.

Las probabilidades de infección determinadas por el equipo de Max Planck indican el límite superior del riesgo en cada caso. “En la vida diaria, la probabilidad real de infección es sin duda de 10 a 100 veces menor”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. Esto se debe a que el aire que sale de la máscara por los bordes se diluye, por lo que no se obtiene todo el aire respirable sin filtrar. Pero asumimos esto porque no podemos medir en todas las situaciones cuánto aire respirable de un usuario de máscara llega a otra persona, y porque queríamos calcular el riesgo de la manera más conservadora posible “, explica Bodenschatz.” En estas condiciones, incluso el el riesgo teórico más grande es pequeño, entonces estás en el lado muy seguro en condiciones reales “. Sin embargo, para el valor comparativo sin la protección de una máscara, el búfer de seguridad resulta ser mucho más pequeño”. Para tal situación, puede determinar la dosis viral inhalada por una persona desprotegida con menos suposiciones “, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri, quien como líder del grupo de investigación en el Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización y autor principal del estudio actual.

“Las máscaras en las escuelas son una muy buena idea”

En sus cálculos del riesgo de infección, el equipo de Göttingen consideró una serie de factores que no se habían incluido previamente en estudios comparables. Por ejemplo, los investigadores investigaron cómo un mal ajuste de la máscara debilita la protección y cómo se puede prevenir. “Los materiales de las máscaras FFP2 o KN95, pero también de algunas máscaras médicas, filtran de manera extremadamente eficaz”, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri. “El riesgo de infección está entonces dominado por el aire que sale y entra por los bordes de la máscara”. Esto sucede cuando el borde de la máscara no está cerca del rostro. En experimentos elaborados, Bagheri, Bodenschatz y su equipo midieron el tamaño y la cantidad de partículas respiratorias que fluyen más allá de los bordes de las máscaras que se ajustan de manera diferente. “Una máscara se puede adaptar de manera excelente a la forma de la cara si dobla su correa de metal en una W redondeada antes de ponérsela”, dice Eberhard Bodenschatz. “Entonces, las partículas de aerosol infecciosas ya no pasan por la máscara y los vasos tampoco se empañan”.

 

Video de 41 segundos sobre la efectividad de las máscaras

Cómo protegen las máscaras contra Covid-19

Utilizando un maniquí, un equipo del Instituto Max Planck de Dinámica y Autoorganización demuestra cómo la nube respiratoria, y posiblemente los coronavirus con ella, se propagan en diferentes escenarios. Sin una máscara, muchas partículas potencialmente infecciosas se dispersan en la habitación. Las mascarillas quirúrgicas ya reducen significativamente la cantidad, incluso si se ajustan mal. Las máscaras ajustadas FFP2 o KN95 protegen particularmente bien.

El equipo también consideró que las gotas que las personas esparcen cuando respiran o hablan se secan mientras están en el aire y se vuelven más ligeras. Esto significa que permanecen en el aire por más tiempo, pero también tienen una mayor concentración de virus como gotas del mismo tamaño directamente después de su liberación. Cuando se inhala ocurre lo contrario: las partículas retoman agua, crecen como una gota en la nube y por tanto se depositan más fácilmente en el tracto respiratorio.

Aunque el análisis detallado de los investigadores de Max Planck en Gotinga muestra que las máscaras FFP2 ajustadas brindan una protección 75 veces mejor en comparación con las máscaras quirúrgicas bien ajustadas y que la forma en que se usa una máscara hace una gran diferencia; Incluso las mascarillas médicas reducen significativamente el riesgo de infección en comparación con una situación sin ningún tipo de protección bucal-nasal. “Por eso es tan importante que las personas usen una máscara durante la pandemia”, dice Gholamhossein Bagheri. Y Eberhard Bodenschatz agrega: “Nuestros resultados muestran una vez más que el uso de máscaras en las escuelas y también en general es una muy buena idea”.